Low density switch and L3 routing support


Hi,

I'm been following Cumulus Linux for a while now and am very interested in getting my hands dirty. I'd like to start with a low density (24 ports or less) and low cost switch for my home lab so I could use and play with (with hopes to eventually suggest using it at the company I work for).

The closest I've found so far are the Edge-corE AS4610-30P (PoE) and AS4610-30T (fanless, no PoE) with ONIE. Their website says it's compatible with Cumulus Linux but it's not currently listed on the Cumulus Linux HCL (Hardware Compatibility List). The 48-port variants (AS4610-54P and AS4610-54P) are though.

Are there any other suggestions on capable and support hardware?

Also does the Cumulus Linux perpetual license include layer 3 routing such as BGP and OSPF? Or is that an add-on similar to Cisco's IP services and Juniper's enhanced feature license.

Shame I missed the recent reddit AMA with Nolan.

Thanks.

3 replies

Userlevel 4
Question 1: "Their website says it's compatible with Cumulus Linux but it's not currently listed on the Cumulus Linux HCL (Hardware Compatibility List). The 48-port variants (AS4610-54P and AS4610-54P) are though."

I'm happy you found the Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) that is the last word on what is officially supported. I've checked our internal database for the AS4610-30T and I can see that we have almost no info on it. I see what you mean... on the Edge-Core website ( http://www.edge-core.com/ProdDtl.asp?... ) they specifically mention support for Cumulus Linux however if you click on the datasheet ( http://www.edge-core.com/temp/ec_down... ) they clarify the typo:
Compatible with the following NOS options:
AS4610-54T and AS4610-54P:
-Cumulus Linux r2.5.4 and later version from Cumulus Networks

I'll ask around internally to figure out if we plan on adding support for that platform but we do not presently support it today.

If you're looking to get started with Cumulus I'd recommend Cumulus VX.... it's a free VM that allows you to get started with Cumulus. You can hook the Cumulus VX's together to create a topology in GNS3 or Virtualbox (or other tools). Vx includes all the features that Cumulus Linux does (without the hardware acceleration because it's a VM) so it's a great way to get your feet wet. We actually use the VX product to simulate entire networks with 20-100+ nodes for testing so it is a GREAT (and free) tool to look at.
If you're committed to real hardware I would recommend taking a look at our RMP platform --> https://cumulusnetworks.com/cumulus-r... as that is the most affordable product we have and again you can do most everything that Cumulus Linux supports (vxlan and ECMP excluded).

Question 2: "Also does the Cumulus Linux perpetual license include layer 3 routing such as BGP and OSPF? Or is that an add-on similar to Cisco's IP services and Juniper's enhanced feature license."
Our license is a one-and-done deal; one license gets you access to everything.

Happy to help with any other questions you might have. Community is the perfect place to ask them 🙂
Userlevel 4
In addition to what Eric is saying... I was thinking about this for home labs. Why not do something like Jim Salter did and build your own little home router.

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/01/numbers-dont-lie-its-time-to-build-your-own-router/

He is a big Ubuntu fan. Met him down in http://greatwideopen.org/ His home router is lacking several things that I would think you would want for a more enterprisey setup. (patenting this term now)
  1. Install ifupdown2 on Ubuntu-> https://support.cumulusnetworks.com/hc/en-us/articles/216130037-Using-ifupdown2-on-Ubuntu
  2. Install Quagga on Ubuntu-> https://support.cumulusnetworks.com/hc/en-us/articles/213177027-Installing-the-Cumulus-Linux-Quagga-...
  3. Install bridge-utils on Ubuntu http://www.linuxfoundation.org/collaborate/workgroups/networking/bridge
  4. Install 802.1q on Ubuntu (VLAN ability) https://wiki.ubuntu.com/vlan
  5. Install bonding (i.e. etherchannels) http://www.unixmen.com/linux-basics-create-network-bonding-on-ubuntu-14-10/
Once you get that up and working you have a pretty powerful inexpensive 'Cumulus-like' device. Its obviously still missing packages like ptm (prescriptive topology manager) but I think you can start asking those questions once you do the 5 things above.

Now the performance is going to be way off. Everything in our HCL is line-rate and tested by QA. Just so people understand where the cost of data center switches come from. There is a big difference from an ASUS or Netgear router from Target and a Dell S6000 32x40Gb switch. Our Switchd will take kernel state and talk to the ASIC (Broadcom or Mellanox) and have equivalent performance to Cisco/Arista/Juniper switches with the same ASIC.

The other option... since we have been GA for awhile now hopefully gear starts showing up on ebay? I would love to grab something myself.... if I can convince the wife to deal with the power bill 🙂
@Eric, I had a look at the Cumulus RMP but it seems it doesn't have L3 routing support?

@Sean, yep already have a little home router set up. I use a fitlet XA10-LAN (which is a little device with 4 1GbE interfaces) running Ubuntu (deployed using Juju).

| $ ip link
| 1: lo: mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1
| 2: enp1s0: mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 10
| 3: enp2s0: mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
| 4: enp3s0: mtu 1500 qdisc noop state DOWN mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000
| 5: enp4s0: mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 10
| 6: enp1s0.20@enp1s0: mtu 1500 qdisc noqueue state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 10

I was hoping to add a L3 switch and set up BGP and/or OSPF between the router and switch (with quagga might I add); mostly just to play around. I suppose I could get another fitlet and try get the Cumulus packages installed on it to play with but I'd rather get hardware that's supported.

Thanks for the reply guys! Really appreciate it.

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